Cat Cooks

Just a collection of my favorite recipes. I can cook - I just can't clean.

RSS     /      Archive     /      Random

Chinese Sweet Bread (makes two loaves)
Ingredients:

2½ cups bread flour3tbsp+2tsp sugar1/2 tsp salt1 large egg½ cup milk120g tangzhong (about half of the tangzhong made)2½ tsp active dry yeast
3 tbsp butter (cut into small pieces, softened at room temperature)


Directions:
1. Warm milk in the microwave for about 20 seconds. Add in yeast and sugar, let sit for 15 minutes until a foam develops.

2. Add flour, salt, milk, egg and tangzhong, butter and yeast mixture into Kitchenaid. Knead on medium until dough comes together and the dough is no longer sticky and is elastic. You should be able to stretch the dough without it breaking right away.

3. Knead the dough into a ball shape. Take a large bowl and grease with oil.  Place dough into  greased bowl and cover with a wet towel. Let it proof until it’s doubled in size, about 40 minutes.

4. Transfer to a clean surface. Divide the dough into eight equal portions. Knead into balls.  Cover with cling wrap, let rest for 15 minutes.
5. Roll out each portion of the dough with a rolling pin into an oval shape.  Take one end of the dough and fold to meet the middle of the oval. Take the other end and fold to meet on top.

6. Flip dough over with the folds facing down,and flatten dough with rolling pin.

7. Flip dough over so the folds face up. Now roll the dough up. Place 4 of the rolls into one 8x5 pan and put a piece of plastic wrap over the rolls. Let them rise until double the size, approximately another 40 minutes.

8. Beat an egg and brush egg mixture on top to create shiny eggwash finish.
9. Bake at 325 degrees F for approximately 25 minutes (convection off)

Chinese Sweet Bread (makes two loaves)

Ingredients:

2½ cups bread flour
3tbsp+2tsp sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1 large egg
½ cup milk
120g tangzhong (about half of the tangzhong made)
2½ tsp active dry yeast
3 tbsp butter (cut into small pieces, softened at room temperature)
Directions:

1. Warm milk in the microwave for about 20 seconds. Add in yeast and sugar, let sit for 15 minutes until a foam develops.
2. Add flour, salt, milk, egg and tangzhong, butter and yeast mixture into Kitchenaid. Knead on medium until dough comes together and the dough is no longer sticky and is elastic. You should be able to stretch the dough without it breaking right away.
3. Knead the dough into a ball shape. Take a large bowl and grease with oil.  Place dough into  greased bowl and cover with a wet towel. Let it proof until it’s doubled in size, about 40 minutes.
4. Transfer to a clean surface. Divide the dough into eight equal portions. Knead into balls.  Cover with cling wrap, let rest for 15 minutes.

5. Roll out each portion of the dough with a rolling pin into an oval shape.  Take one end of the dough and fold to meet the middle of the oval. Take the other end and fold to meet on top.
6. Flip dough over with the folds facing down,and flatten dough with rolling pin.
7. Flip dough over so the folds face up. Now roll the dough up. Place 4 of the rolls into one 8x5 pan and put a piece of plastic wrap over the rolls. Let them rise until double the size, approximately another 40 minutes.
8. Beat an egg and brush egg mixture on top to create shiny eggwash finish.

9. Bake at 325 degrees F for approximately 25 minutes (convection off)
— 2 months ago

Chewy Oatmeal Bars

Ingredients
4 tbsp. (1/2 stick) unsalted butter or coconut oil
1/4 cup packed light brown sugar or brown rice syrup
1/4 cup honey
2 cups plain granola
1 cup rice cereal (Rice Krispies, etc.)
1/4 cup semisweet chocolate chips
1/4 cup peanut butter chips
Process
Line two 9×5 loaf pans or one 11×7 inch baking pan (see tip #4 above if you want to use 9×13) with foil or parchment. Lightly butter or spray the foil.
Combine butter, honey and brown sugar in a large saucepan over medium heat. Stir until the butter is melted.
Bring the mixture to a boil, then lower the heat to medium-low and simmer until the sugar is dissolved, 2 minutes. Remove the saucepan from the heat.
Add the granola and rice cereal into the saucepan and fold them into the sauce until evenly coated.
Spread the mixture into the prepared pans and press firmly with a spatula to evenly fill. Sprinkle the chocolate and peanut butter chips onto the top of the granola and gently press them down with the spatula.
Let sit for 15-20 minutes or until mostly cooled and set*; lift out of the pan and cut into bars.
- See more at: http://backtothecuttingboard.com/dessert/no-bake-chewy-granola-bars/#sthash.2ZGT2fv8.dpuf

— 2 months ago

Perfect dough for bao

Ingredients

1/4 cup sugar
1 3/4 cup warm water (105°F – 115°F)
1 tbsp yeast
6 cups flour
1 tbsp baking powder
2 tbsps olive oil

(i used one “cup” hot water from keurig, and 3/4 cup cold water

and 3 cups all purpose, 3 cups bread flour)


Directions

In a medium bowl, dissolve the sugar in warm water and add the yeast. Let the yeast stand for about ten minutes or until it becomes foamy, floating to the top. Sift the flour (I never sift anything) into a large bowl. Add the baking powder, shortening, and the yeast liquid. Mix well. If the dough is dry, add a little water. If the dough is too wet, add more flour. Knead the dough until smooth (took me ten minutes by hand) Place the dough in a large bowl and cover tightly with plastic wrap. Let the dough rise in a warm place for a couple of hours until it has tripled in size.

Do this: cut 24 squares of parchment or wax paper, 2 1/2-inches a side.

Assemble the bao : Knead the risen dough until it is smooth and elastic. Again, if it is too dry, wet your hand(s) and knead it – if it is too wet, add some flour and knead it in. Because I work on a finite area cutting board (i.e. not a long counter), I found it easiest to cut the dough into quarters and make a log from each quarter. Keep the unused dough under plastic or a damp kitchen towel to prevent drying out. Cut each log into 6 equal pieces and flatten each piece with your hand to make a disc. Use your fingers to pinch the outer inch of the disc thinner than the center. Then shape a sort of well in the thicker center of the dough. Spoon a tablespoon (or more, if you can handle it) of the pork filling into the center of the dough. Pleat the edges together, with the intent of gathering the edges to form a sort of bowl from the dough (use your thumb or spoon to push the filling down). If you care about the presentation (hey, some people don’t) then wipe your fingers clean of any filling on a wet cloth before twisting and pinching the pleats together at the top. If there is excess dough, pinch it off. Set thebao on a square of parchment. Repeat for the rest and let them stand for about 10 minutes.

Steaming: Place the buns in a steamer with at least 2 inches between them as they will expand during steaming. You will not be able to fit them all in your steamer unless you have 1) a giant steamer or 2) a million layers – so be patient and don’t cram them together, just steam in two or three batches.

If you have a wok, bring 2 inches of water to a boil and set your steamer over the wok (make sure the steamer doesn’t actually sit in the water – that would be called boiling and we don’t want that!). If you don’t have a wok (I don’t) then this is what I did: I found a stockpot that fits my generic bamboo steamer perfectly. The fit doesn’t have to be perfect, just don’t use such a large pot that the steam escapes. I filled the stockpot with 2 inches of water and then placed a small metal rack (you can find these in random Asian grocery stores) in the center. Bring the water to a boil, place the steamer on the rack.

Steam for 10 minutes. Serve hot. Makes 24.

Storage: Once cooled, you can seal these in an airtight container or ziploc bag and keep in the refrigerator for up to a week. To reheat, either steam them again for a few minutes or do the ghetto method: place the bao in a bowl, cover with a plate, and microwave for a minute or two. You can also freeze the bao in a sealed bag and reheat them by either steaming or nuking (just add more time than if they were refrigerated).

— 2 months ago